Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: slavery, secession, and the president's war powers

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The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and Lincoln's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency. Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion in 1857, when the Chief Justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to honor. Lincoln attacked the opinion as a warped judicial interperatation of the Framers' intent and accused Taney of being a member of a pro-slavery national conspiracy. In his first inaugural address, Lincoln insisted that the South had no legal right to secede. Taney, who administered the oath of office to Lincoln, believed that the South's seccession was legal and in the best interests of both sections of the country. Once the war began, Lincoln broadly interpreted his constitutional powers as commander in chief to prosecute the war, suspending habeas corpus, censoring the press, and allowing military courts to try civilians for treason. Taney vociferously disagreed, accusing Lincoln of assuming dictatorial powers in violation of the Constitution. Lincoln ignored Taney's protests, and exercised his presidential authority fearlessly, determined that he would preserve the Union. James F. Simon skillfully brings to life this compelling story of the momentous tug-of-war between the President and the Chief Justice during the worst crisis in the nation's history."...taut and gripping...a dramatic, charged narrative."-- Publishers Weekly Starred Review
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ISBN:
9780743250320
074325032
9781400123315
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Grouped Work ID 7df7a22d-3b33-398a-9104-89d8ae1b1caf
full_title lincoln and chief justice taney slavery secession and the presidents war powers
author simon james f
grouping_category book
lastUpdate 2016-12-14 05:19:12AM

Solr Details

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auth_author2 Allen, Richard, 1957-2013.
author Simon, James F.
author-letter Simon, James F.
author2 Allen, Richard, 1957-2013., hoopla digital.
author2-role Allen, Richard,1957-2013.|Narrator, hoopla digital.
author_additional James F. Simon.
author_display Simon, James F
availability_toggle_boulder Available Now, Available Online, Entire Collection
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callnumber-first K - Law
callnumber-subject KF - United States
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date_added 2006-11-28T07:00:00Z
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detailed_location_boulder Boulder Main Adult NonFiction, Online Hoopla Collection
display_description The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and Lincoln's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency.Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion in 1857, when the Chief Justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to honor. Lincoln attacked the opinion as a warped judicial interperatation of the Framers' intent and accused Taney of being a member of a pro-slavery national conspiracy.In his first inaugural address, Lincoln insisted that the South had no legal right to secede. Taney, who administered the oath of office to Lincoln, believed that the South's seccession was legal and in the best interests of both sections of the country.Once the war began, Lincoln broadly interpreted his constitutional powers as commander in chief to prosecute the war, suspending habeas corpus, censoring the press, and allowing military courts to try civilians for treason. Taney vociferously disagreed, accusing Lincoln of assuming dictatorial powers in violation of the Constitution. Lincoln ignored Taney's protests, and exercised his presidential authority fearlessly, determined that he would preserve the Union.James F. Simon skillfully brings to life this compelling story of the momentous tug-of-war between the President and the Chief Justice during the worst crisis in the nation's history."...taut and gripping...a dramatic, charged narrative."-Publishers Weekly Starred Review
econtent_protection_type_boulder Always Available
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edition Unabridged.
era 1777-1864, 1809-1865
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geographic_facet United States
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id 7df7a22d-3b33-398a-9104-89d8ae1b1caf
isbn 074325032, 9780743250320, 9781400123315
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lc_subject Executive power, History, Law and legislation, Secession, Slavery, War and emergency powers
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local_callnumber_boulder 342.087 Simo
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physical 1 online resource (1 audio file (11hr., 30 min.)) : digital., 324 p. ; 24 cm.
popularity 2
primary_isbn 9780743250320
publishDate 2006
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publisher Made available through hoopla,, Simon & Schuster,, Tantor Audio :
rating 2.5
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subject_facet Executive power -- United States -- History, Lincoln, Abraham, -- 1809-1865, Secession -- United States -- History, Slavery -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History, Taney, Roger Brooke, -- 1777-1864, War and emergency powers -- United States -- History
target_audience Adult
target_audience_full Adult
title Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney : slavery, secession, and the president's war powers
title_display Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney : slavery, secession, and the president's war powers
title_full Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney : slavery, secession, and the president's war powers / James F. Simon, Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: slavery, secession, and the president's war powers [electronic resource] / James F. Simon
title_short Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney :
title_sort lincoln and chief justice taney slavery, secession, and the president's war powers
title_sub slavery, secession, and the president's war powers
topic Executive power United States History, Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865, Secession United States History, Slavery Law and legislation United States History, Taney, Roger Brooke, 1777-1864, War and emergency powers United States History
topic_facet Executive power, History, Law and legislation, Lincoln, Abraham, Secession, Slavery, Taney, Roger Brooke, War and emergency powers