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The interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald inside the Soviet Union
(eAudiobook)

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Published:
[United States] : Blackstone Publishing, 2014.
Format:
eAudiobook
Edition:
Unabridged.
Content Description:
1 online resource (1 audio file (8hr., 10 min.)) : digital.
Status:
Available Online
Description

Lee Harvey Oswald's assassination of President Kennedy in 1963 remains one of the most horrifying and hotly debated crimes in American history. Just as perplexing as the assassination is the assassin himself; the twenty-four-year-old Oswald's hazy background and motivations-and his subsequent murder at the hands of Jack Ruby-make him an intriguing yet frustratingly enigmatic figure. Because Oswald briefly defected to the Soviet Union, some historians allege he was a Soviet agent. But as Peter Savodnik shows in The Interloper, Oswald's time in the USSR reveals a stranger, more chilling story. Oswald ventured to Russia at the age of nineteen, after a failed stint in the US Marine Corps and a childhood spent shuffling from address to address with his unstable, needy mother. Like many of his generation, Oswald struggled for a sense of belonging in postwar American society, which could be materialistic, atomized, and alienating. The Soviet Union, with its promise of collectivism and camaraderie, seemed to offer an alternative. While traveling in Europe, Oswald slipped across the Soviet border, soon settling in Minsk, where he worked at a radio and television factory. But Oswald quickly became just as disillusioned with his adopted country as he had been with the United States. He spoke very little Russian, had difficulty adapting to the culture of his new home, and found few trustworthy friends-indeed most, it became clear, were informing on him to the KGB. After nearly three years, Oswald returned to America feeling utterly defeated and more alone than ever, and as Savodnik shows, he began to look for an outlet for his frustration and rage. Drawing on groundbreaking research, including interviews with Oswald's friends and acquaintances in Russia and the United States, The Interloper brilliantly evokes the shattered psyche not just of Oswald himself but also of the era he so tragically defined.

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Language:
English
ISBN:
9781982473815 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book), 1982473819 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book)

Notes

Restrictions on Access
Digital content provided by hoopla.
Participants/Performers
Read by Stefan Rudnicki.
Description
Lee Harvey Oswald's assassination of President Kennedy in 1963 remains one of the most horrifying and hotly debated crimes in American history. Just as perplexing as the assassination is the assassin himself; the twenty-four-year-old Oswald's hazy background and motivations-and his subsequent murder at the hands of Jack Ruby-make him an intriguing yet frustratingly enigmatic figure. Because Oswald briefly defected to the Soviet Union, some historians allege he was a Soviet agent. But as Peter Savodnik shows in The Interloper, Oswald's time in the USSR reveals a stranger, more chilling story. Oswald ventured to Russia at the age of nineteen, after a failed stint in the US Marine Corps and a childhood spent shuffling from address to address with his unstable, needy mother. Like many of his generation, Oswald struggled for a sense of belonging in postwar American society, which could be materialistic, atomized, and alienating. The Soviet Union, with its promise of collectivism and camaraderie, seemed to offer an alternative. While traveling in Europe, Oswald slipped across the Soviet border, soon settling in Minsk, where he worked at a radio and television factory. But Oswald quickly became just as disillusioned with his adopted country as he had been with the United States. He spoke very little Russian, had difficulty adapting to the culture of his new home, and found few trustworthy friends-indeed most, it became clear, were informing on him to the KGB. After nearly three years, Oswald returned to America feeling utterly defeated and more alone than ever, and as Savodnik shows, he began to look for an outlet for his frustration and rage. Drawing on groundbreaking research, including interviews with Oswald's friends and acquaintances in Russia and the United States, The Interloper brilliantly evokes the shattered psyche not just of Oswald himself but also of the era he so tragically defined.
System Details
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
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Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Savodnik, P., & Rudnicki, S. (2014). The interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald inside the Soviet Union. Unabridged. [United States]: Blackstone Publishing.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Savodnik, Peter and Stefan Rudnicki. 2014. The Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union. [United States]: Blackstone Publishing.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Savodnik, Peter and Stefan Rudnicki, The Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union. [United States]: Blackstone Publishing, 2014.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Savodnik, Peter., and Stefan Rudnicki. The Interloper: Lee Harvey Oswald Inside the Soviet Union. Unabridged. [United States]: Blackstone Publishing, 2014.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2010. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
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Grouped Work ID:
3d245bc2-6a3e-93e7-c7f6-c3e687e2bc26
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Hoopla Extract Information

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titleThe Interloper
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Record Information

Last File Modification TimeNov 29, 2019 04:08:08 AM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeJan 16, 2020 08:02:01 PM

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